Rengarenk Hayat

Selam Bloglar.

(via coca-cola)

archiveofaffinities:

Jean Arp, Untitled, 1922-1923

archiveofaffinities:

Jean Arp, Untitled, 1922-1923

rhamphotheca:


A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Barbary Lion
by Mat McDermott
Formerly found from Morocco to Egypt, the Barbary lion (also known as the Atlas lion or Nubian lion) was the largest and heaviest of the lion subspecies. Unlike other lions, due to scarcity of food in its habitat, the Barbary lion did not live in prides. The last wild Barbary lion was shot in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco in 1922. However, questions remain about whether some lions held in captivity at zoos or in circuses may be descendants of the Barbary lion. Historical note: Lions used in gladiatorial combat in Roman times were most likely Barbary lions. The photo above dates from 1893 and was taken in Algeria.
(via: TreeHugger)       (photo: Sir Alfred Edward Pease, 1893)

rhamphotheca:

A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Barbary Lion

by Mat McDermott

Formerly found from Morocco to Egypt, the Barbary lion (also known as the Atlas lion or Nubian lion) was the largest and heaviest of the lion subspecies. Unlike other lions, due to scarcity of food in its habitat, the Barbary lion did not live in prides. The last wild Barbary lion was shot in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco in 1922. However, questions remain about whether some lions held in captivity at zoos or in circuses may be descendants of the Barbary lion. Historical note: Lions used in gladiatorial combat in Roman times were most likely Barbary lions. The photo above dates from 1893 and was taken in Algeria.

(via: TreeHugger)       (photo: Sir Alfred Edward Pease, 1893)

rhamphotheca:


A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Thylacine aka Tasmanian Tiger
by Mat McDermott
The largest carnivorous marsupial in modern times (standing about 2’ tall and 6’ long including the tail), the Thylacine once lived in mainland Australia and New Guinea, by the time of European settlement it was already nearly extinct, due to human activity. In Tasmania however (hence, the more common name of Tasmanian tiger or Tasmanian wolf) it lived on, with the last one confirmed killed in the wild in 1930. The last Thylacine in captivity, pictured above, died in 1936.
That said, through the 1960s people suspected that the Thylacine may have held on in small pockets, with the final declaration of extinction not happening until the 1980s. To this day however, occasional reports of sightings surface in Tasmania and New Guinea.
(via: TreeHugger)       (photographer: unknown, 1933)

rhamphotheca:

A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Thylacine aka Tasmanian Tiger

by Mat McDermott

The largest carnivorous marsupial in modern times (standing about 2’ tall and 6’ long including the tail), the Thylacine once lived in mainland Australia and New Guinea, by the time of European settlement it was already nearly extinct, due to human activity. In Tasmania however (hence, the more common name of Tasmanian tiger or Tasmanian wolf) it lived on, with the last one confirmed killed in the wild in 1930. The last Thylacine in captivity, pictured above, died in 1936.

That said, through the 1960s people suspected that the Thylacine may have held on in small pockets, with the final declaration of extinction not happening until the 1980s. To this day however, occasional reports of sightings surface in Tasmania and New Guinea.

(via: TreeHugger)       (photographer: unknown, 1933)

rhamphotheca:


A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Seychelles Giant Tortoise
by Mat McDermott
There’s some controversy over whether the Seychelles Giant Tortoise is extinct altogether or just extinct in the wild. In the 19th century the Seychelles Giant Tortoise, much like similar tortoise species on other Indian Ocean islands, was hunted to extinction. Prior to being wiped out in the wild by the 1840s, it lived only the edges of marshes and streams, grazing on vegetation. In captivity however, there is some hope that a dozen tortoises on La Digue Islandmay in fact be Seychelles Giant Tortoises. Furthermore, one tortoise, believed to now top 180 years old and kept on Saint Helena (an island in the South Atlantic), may also be of the species.
(via: TreeHugger)       (photographer: unknown, 1905)

rhamphotheca:

A Glimpse of What We’ve Lost:  The Seychelles Giant Tortoise

by Mat McDermott

There’s some controversy over whether the Seychelles Giant Tortoise is extinct altogether or just extinct in the wild. In the 19th century the Seychelles Giant Tortoise, much like similar tortoise species on other Indian Ocean islands, was hunted to extinction. Prior to being wiped out in the wild by the 1840s, it lived only the edges of marshes and streams, grazing on vegetation. In captivity however, there is some hope that a dozen tortoises on La Digue Islandmay in fact be Seychelles Giant Tortoises. Furthermore, one tortoise, believed to now top 180 years old and kept on Saint Helena (an island in the South Atlantic), may also be of the species.

(via: TreeHugger)       (photographer: unknown, 1905)

rhamphotheca:

Boatlife  by Maria Schoof
http://www.artdoxa.com/schoofbay/

rhamphotheca:

Boatlife  by Maria Schoof

http://www.artdoxa.com/schoofbay/

rhamphotheca:

Kätzig II  by Maria Schoof
http://www.artdoxa.com/schoofbay/

rhamphotheca:

Kätzig II  by Maria Schoof

http://www.artdoxa.com/schoofbay/

kateordie:

Tasteless smut (Taken with Instagram)

kateordie:

Tasteless smut (Taken with Instagram)

gailsimone:

arkhamboundz:

The Survivor vs The Soldier.
August 8, 2012.
 Batgirl: The New 52

Dang.  You know what?
I kinda wish this had been the actual cover copy, in this lettering, too. VERY COOL!

gailsimone:

arkhamboundz:

The Survivor vs The Soldier.

August 8, 2012.


Batgirl: The New 52

Dang.  You know what?

I kinda wish this had been the actual cover copy, in this lettering, too. VERY COOL!